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Dec 28, 2012 by Patrick Icasas in Project Management 101 & Tools

Competing For Resources: How to Defend Your Team Composition

If your project team is working within a larger project management department, then you are probably sharing resources with other project managers. “Sharing” in this context is a misnomer, because resources are given specific assignments, and cannot usually work on other projects concurrently. If another project manager wants to use your resource, they will have to either wait their turn, or appeal to management for a restructuring.

When that happens, you will probably have to defend your team’s composition. Some project management offices do this as part of a regular process, be it daily, weekly, or monthly, where team assignments are shuffled around based on where they are most needed. If you’re not careful, you could end up being stripped of a vital team member at a critical moment.

To prevent that, you need to go into meetings organized and prepared. Here are a few things you should have ready:

Task List

The point of a resource assessment meeting is to determine who is being used for what, and if they can be freed up and reassigned elsewhere. Bring in a complete task list or resource loading report for every single one of your team members to show that they are necessary for you to meet your deadlines. Bring a separate list of future tasks as well, so that the other project managers will know that your team members other important tasks coming down the line. If you can bring a task list that shows inter-dependencies, all the better.

Risk Assessment

If you want to keep your team intact, you have to show your manager (and the other PMs) how the loss of one will affect the rest of the team. A Gantt chart can provide an excellent visual representation of your team member’s activities and the dependencies associated with them. Be sure and include dates and deliverables in your risk assessment report, and how these changes will affect the client.

Establish an ETA

You can fight as hard and as long as you want, but you will have to give up your team member eventually. What the above points are trying to do is to help you keep them through the critical period. You may be fostering teamwork within your own group, but you also have to do so within the larger organization. And that means compromises.

Set an estimated date or period when the team member in question will be able to safely switch projects. If that is not good enough for the requesting project manager, work with them to reach an effective date that will work. Think of out of the box situations if you need to, such as trading one specialization for another, so there will not be a net loss of manpower on either end.

Even if the situation doesn’t work out for you, and you do end up losing vital resources, remember that these are not “your” team members: they’re the company’s. Management is doing their best to balance resources so that every project becomes a success, not just one. Keep this perspective and allow your fellow project manager this favor.

Because next meeting, it’ll be your turn.

patrick-icasas
Patrick Icasas

Patrick Icasas is a former marketing project manager with 7 years of marketing and PR agency experience, managing creative projects for brands such as Nokia, Verizon Wireless, and Adobe. He now spends his time helping people make the most out of their project management software and entertaining his 5 year old daughter.

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